• Installation View of "Project. Fold. Collapse.",
  • 2017,
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "Project. Fold. Collapse.",
  • 2017,
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "Project. Fold. Collapse.",
  • 2017,
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "Project. Fold. Collapse.",
  • 2017,
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "Project. Fold. Collapse.",
  • 2017,
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "Project. Fold. Collapse.",
  • 2017,
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "Project. Fold. Collapse.",
  • 2017,
  • Jessica Smolinski

Geometrically, when we project a volume, we map it onto a two-dimensional space.  A collapse achieves the same thing, but it seems to be disorderly.  A fold, in contrast, adds transient dimensions, and often, a palpable thickness.  These operations have abstruse technical definitions that reflect their spatial complexity, but even the least mathematically minded person enacts them intuitively.

So far, I have been a painter, and concerns of how the volumetric world is translated to and from the flat canvas permeate my work.  Here, in a foray into the almost three-dimensional, I have taken a familiar and simple folded form to inspect its internal logic versus my understanding of it.

Without conscious awareness, we move a paper bag from its collapsed to expanded state.  I believe that also, we easily grasp that a paper bag is folded from a single sheet of paper, even if it takes more study to learn to make one ourselves.   My interest is to draw out these transformations and our experience of them.  That I can open a lunch bag, or even invent one, doesn’t mean I have any awareness of the cognitive processes as work.  More broadly, just because I can look at a drawing and know it is a mapping, doesn’t mean I can experience the mapping.These pieces may reveal elements of the experience, though, and give us a vantage point from which to watch.