• Installation View of "hello, world!",
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "hello, world!",
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "hello, world!",
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "hello, world!",
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "hello, world!",
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "hello, world!",
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "hello, world!",
  • Jessica Smolinski
  • Installation View of "hello, world!",
  • Jessica Smolinski

Context

From Wikipedia*

A “Hello World!” program is a computer program that outputs “Hello, World!” (or some variant thereof) on a display device. Because it is typically one of the simplest programs possible in most programming languages, it is by tradition often used to illustrate to beginners the most basic syntax of a programming language. It is also used to verify that a language or system is operating correctly.

A “Hello world!” program has become the traditional first program that many people learn. . . Using this simple program as a basis, computer science principles or elements of a specific programming language can be explained to novice programmers. Experienced programmers learning new languages can also gain a lot of information about a given language’s syntax and structure from a “Hello, world!” program.

In addition, “Hello world!” can be a useful sanity test to make sure that a language’s compilerdevelopment environment, and run-time environment are correctly installed. Configuring a complete programming toolchain from scratch to the point where even trivial programs can be compiled and run can involve substantial amounts of work. For this reason, a simple program is used first when testing a new tool chain.

“Hello world!” is also used by computer hackers as a proof of concept that arbitrary code can be executed through an exploit where the system designers did not intend code to be executed…

Concept

hello, world! is an exhibition that explores how a queer identity can function as a clear projection of self while simultaneously resisting and reframing normative definitions of identity. The complex, humorous and deeply personal approaches each artist brings to the exhibition offers a visual syntax of queer experiences.  The title hello, world! reminds us that language is learned, tested, reframed and hopefully — hacked.

Press Coverage: 

Yale Daily News 12/11/15 Naik, Rohan Wigging out in “hello, world!”

Artscope Magazine 1/5/15 Martins, J. Fatima Challenging Gender Expression at Artspace